By Kanika Saini

Edited by Nandita Singh, Senior Editor, The Indian Economist

Drug is such a powerful word, a word that creates curiosity among unaware youngsters to experience the intoxication it causes. I am emphasizing that it is a powerful word because when I was working on my matrix; there were students in my class who were constantly consuming drugs that were cheap and easily accessible in one form or the other. Whitener pen, the fluid used by students to conceal errors in their written work, Vicks gel, and nail paint remover were proving to be the beginning steps to their gloomy life of addiction. They kept sniffing these substances for hours and were sleepy all day.

Today, the scenario of drug consumption is basically the same, but with greater alternatives. Youngsters in the city are high on ‘Meow Meow’, a new synthetic drug in the city called Mephedrone. Mumbai’s rave scene is getting hooked to the new drug, and the city’s bands are said to be heavy abusers of the substance. The pace of its popularity is constantly rising due to its mass availability, and therefore, no imports are required. It can be ordered online and will be home delivered.

Drifting our attention towards South Mumbai; bhindi bazaar area, where the rate of smuggling is tremendously rising. Almost every day, 60 kg of Mephedrone is sold and consumed in India, the customer base for which is more than a lakh. After interviewing one of the shopkeepers in that area, I came to know that the usage of Mephedrone is highest amongst teenagers because of its cheap price. They get it for barely 50-100 rupees and if the individuals of society try to take a stand against it; cops react ineffectively stating that technically the drug is legal to sell as it is not in the list of banned drugs under the Narcotics, Drugs and Psychotropic Substance (NCB) Act, 1958, as it has medicinal value and is used as an anesthetic.
“Mephedrone users enjoy increased energy, self-confidence and talkativeness, euphoria, mental and physical stimulation, an enhanced sense of touch and empathy and a bit of sensory distortion. They also frequently enjoy a strong craving for more of the drug. It appears as a white or off-white powder, which is primarily either snorted or swallowed. Addicts are tempted to have more and more of it again and again, to keep the high going and prevent the come down. When addicts come down from the high, they also tend to become depressed. It is such a powerful recreational drug that addicts take for effects similar to amphetamines and ecstasy,” explained Dr Merchant.” (

Israel banned the usage of Mephedrone in 2008, while Europe banned it in 2010. It is a new drug in India, where it is still being sold legally. The government should immediately put this dangerous chemical under the NDPS Act and law-enforcing agencies must call in for a crackdown.

Kanika Saini is currently carrying out with her economics honors degree from a renowned institute of India, lady shri ram college for women.she is from gurgaon and did her schooling from “summer fields school “.she has been working in NGO as a volunteer for a year at “Indian cancer society”.she  volunteered at various cancer institutes including AIMS ,prashanti cancer centre etc.she also did  street plays on awarness of breast cancer at medanta hospital ,gurgaon. She is currently working as a HR intern in marketing department of a travel agency “made to travel”.she is now a part of  a prestigious “the economics times” columnist program,as a intern.

Posted by The Indian Economist | For the Curious Mind