By Samruddhi Mahapatra

Edited by Sanchita Malhotra, Associate Editor, The Indian Economist

US Secretary of State, John Kerry, visited Kabul to negotiate the dispute between the two presidential candidates, Dr Abdullah Abdullah and Dr Ashraf Ghani Ahmadzai. The disputed election threatens to stir up ethnic tensions and poses a challenge to a peaceful political transition.

The Independent Election Commission, the organisation that conducted the historic election, declared Ghani the winner of the second round of voting. Abdullah, who won the first round of election, rejected the results and threatened to form his own government.

Worried that the country could be thrown into chaos, Kerry rushed to Kabul, to figure out a settlement between the two men. They reached an agreement for an audit of all 8 million votes. Even though the audit will be supervised by the Independent Election Commission and the UN, it still won’t eliminate possibilities of fraud. Kerry has convinced both the candidates to hold off rash action while the audit is being conducted.

Taliban seeks to take advantage of the dispute between the presidential candidates. If neither of the candidates can reach a proper settlement, the winner may very well be the Taliban. Many fear that as the American forces recede, insurgent forces will only gain strength. Internal instability will only aid them.

Taking advantage of this political situation Taliban has already launched several attacks across Afghanistan. Suicide bombers and gunmen have staged deadly attacks in the government compounds. There has been a sharp rise in the civilian deaths. UN has expressed its concern regarding the government soldiers and police to protect the Afghan people after the US and foreign forces leave.

In the recent BRICS summit, Indian PM, Modi, has expressed his concerns over the delicate situation in Afghanistan and has appealed for all leaders to help stabilise the country.

For the sake of the world peace, it is extremely essential, that whoever wins will create a government that will be accepted by all ethnic factions.


Samruddhi is a student, pursuing English Hons. in Kirori Mal College. She is an avid reader and loves learning new things. An aspiring writer, she believes that everything around us has a story to tell. With big dreams, she strives forward to achieve them. She wants her writings to be read by everyone and appreciates constructive criticism.

Posted by The Indian Economist | For the Curious Mind